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Stand And Deliver Dale Carnegie Pdf

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By Dale Carnegie Training. Just as certainly, the Nightingale-Conant Corporation is the world leader in audio learning technology. Now, Dale Carnegie and Nightingale-Conant are proud to bring you this definitive book on speaking in public. Literally since the dawn of civilization, speaking well in front of others has been an ongoing human challenge. This was especially true for the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, but public speaking ability was also highly esteemed in biblical times, and by Native American tribes, and by the cultures of India and China.

The Art of Public Speaking Summary and Review

By Dale Carnegie Training. Just as certainly, the Nightingale-Conant Corporation is the world leader in audio learning technology. Now, Dale Carnegie and Nightingale-Conant are proud to bring you this definitive book on speaking in public. Literally since the dawn of civilization, speaking well in front of others has been an ongoing human challenge. This was especially true for the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, but public speaking ability was also highly esteemed in biblical times, and by Native American tribes, and by the cultures of India and China.

Fascinating as it might be, however, our purpose here is not a history lesson. These are timeless principles upon which all great speakers have relied—though each has done so in his or her own way. So please read carefully. Human beings are talking beings. Good conversation is one of the great joys of human commerce. Good conversation should be like the game of tennis, in which the ball is struck back and forth, with each player participating equally.

Bores are like golfers who just keep hitting their own ball, over and over and over. Good conversationalists make good speakers. Their antennae are forever alert, picking up signals from their audience and responding to those signals in the presentation. Good speakers achieve a marvelous give-and-take with listeners, just as good conversationalists do in a social setting.

More specifically, both speakers and conversationalists recognize that people desire recognition more than any other factor. They frequently ask questions such as Do you agree with that? It might be silence, rapt attention, nods, laughter, or concern. If listeners are bored, they will always find ways of showing that, despite their polite efforts to hide their feelings.

When interest leaves, the sell goes out of our message. Our responsibility is not only to create a speech that will lead an audience to a believable conclusion. We must also make the building blocks of that conclusion as fascinating as we can.

In this way we can hold the attention of our audience until we get to that all-important final point. In addition, if we can develop techniques that make our audience feel that we are conversing with them, we will convey that we care what they are thinking, and that will create the emotional climate for them to accept us as favorably as possible.

Along with understanding the similarities between speaking in conversation and speaking in public, you should also understand certain important differences. David Letterman has the ability to speak with virtually anybody while 10 million viewers are looking in.

Now, you many not think of David Letterman as a great public speaker, but he draws on the same principles that virtually every accomplished speaker has used since ancient times.

What are these principles? Learn the material so well that you own it. Be able to fill every second of your presentation with solid content. To make this point, Dale Carnegie liked to invoke the example of Luther Burbank, a great scientist by any measure and probably the greatest botanist of all time. Burbank once said, I have often produced a million plants in order to find one or two really good ones—and then I destroyed all the inferior specimens. A presentation ought to be prepared in that same lavish and discriminating spirit.

Assemble a hundred thoughts and discard ninety—or even ninety-nine. Collect more material, more information, than there is any possibility of employing. Gather it for the additional confidence it will give you, and for the sureness of touch.

Gather it for the effect it will have on your mind and heart and whole manner of speaking. This is a basic factor in preparation. Yet speakers constantly ignore it. Carnegie actually believed that speakers should know forty times more about their topic than they share in a presentation!

Knowing one topic supremely well is obviously much more practical than trying to master a larger number. Professional salespeople, marketing experts, and leaders in the advertising profession know the importance of selling one thing at a time. Only catalogs can successfully handle a multitude of items. At the end, the problem is restated and the solution quickly summarized. Your opening statement should be an attention getter. A sobering thought indeed. It captures immediate interest, and everyone is thinking, Why, that would presage the end of the world.

What are we doing about it? By invoking an internationally recognized authority as your reference—someone such as the late Jacques Cousteau, for instance—you provide supporting evidence that your opening remark is true, then you outline the possible ways that the disaster might be averted. Not all talks are about social problems, of course. You might be talking about a recent fishing trip, in which case you find something of special interest in the story and open with that.

You might say, Ounce for ounce, the rainbow trout is one of the gamest fish on earth. After a few words about the fish you were after, you can work in the rest. Watch your personal pronouns. Keep yourself out of your conversation as much as possible. The purpose of the speech is not to talk about you but rather the subject matter. An old saying is that small minds talk about things, average minds talk about people, and great minds talk about ideas. The idea is the good appearance or the protection of the house.

The fishing-trip story is about the idea of getting away and going after exciting game fish. One idea, well developed, is the key.

A beautiful painting is put together by a thousand brushstrokes, each stroke making a contribution to the main theme, the overall picture. When speakers—especially inexperienced speakers—prepare a talk, their biggest fear is not having enough to say to fill the allotted time.

They puff their presentation. They wind up trying to cram the story of their lives into their fifteen minutes at the podium. The presentation gets bigger, but instead of really growing, it just swells. You say just enough to fill your time effectively. To reach this level of mastery, you should begin preparing ten days to two weeks before your event.

Start your preparation by sitting down with a pencil and paper for twenty minutes—no less and no more—and writing at least fifty questions about your topic. Fifty is the minimum, but you should definitely try for as many as possible. Write your questions as quickly as you can. This stage of preparation is a sprint, not a leisurely stroll through your mental library. The answers will come later in other sessions leading up to your talk.

Let me repeat, your first session should be limited to twenty minutes, and it should be done the old-fashioned way, with an actual pencil and paper. This is when the computer becomes an essential tool.

Begin by creating a document file of your questions—there should be at least fifty—and quickly writing an answer for each one based on your own knowledge. Write this just as you would say it if you were sitting in Starbucks with a good friend. Just keep at it until you feel your energy start to fade.

Resist the temptation to use the Internet to gather information. That will come later. Right now your job is to access everything you know about your topic, which is probably a lot more than you think you know. Just make sure that you complete your answers with three or four days left before your talk. Mastery allows you to feel completely confident in your role as an authority.

So pick and choose the pertinent and hard-hitting information that you want to include. For some presentations you have little or no prior information. Other times the opposite will be true. Your problem is to select and arrange the information. Your talk will come off as sketchy and fragmented. Be frank with yourself and your audience about your relationship to the topic. You might want to take only one aspect of your topic and expand upon it.

Make liberal use of illustrations, personal observations, and self-revelations. Your goal should always be to share your authentic point of view with the audience. That may be the view of an excited and highly motivated learner, or of an experienced and completely genuine, reliable, and empathetic teacher.

No, you should definitely not memorize all or part of your talk, and, no, you should not even write it out. Later in the book we discuss organizational templates for talks of various lengths. Rehearsing your presentation should happen in two ways, and the first one takes place entirely inside your head.

As your written preparation is continuing, you should constantly be revisiting, revising, and rehearsing your talk in your mind.

Think of it when you first wake up in the morning. Think of it some more just before bed. Go over it again if you have a commute to work.

Stand and Deliver: How to Become a Masterful Communicator and Public Speaker

My library. Books on Google Play. Account Options Sign in. My library Help Advanced Book Search. My library Books on Google Play. Dale Carnegie Training. Simon and Schuster , M03 15 - pages.


Discover in the Stand and Deliver book summary how to overcome the fear of public speaking and become the great communicator you've always wanted to be​!


Stand and Deliver: The Dale Carnegie Method to Public Speaking

Stand and Delivergives you everything you need to know to become an incredibly poised, polished, masterful communicator. Someone who can hold an audience of 1, 10, or in the palm of your hand, from the first word you speak to them until the last. You will learn

Dale Carnegie Training.

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Я разрушу все ваши планы. Вы близки к осуществлению своей заветной мечты - до этого остается всего несколько часов. Управлять всей информацией в мире. И ТРАНСТЕКСТ больше не нужен. Никаких ограничений - только свободная информация. Это шанс всей вашей жизни. И вы хотите его упустить.

Год назад высокопоставленный сотрудник аппарата Белого дома начал получать электронные письма с угрозами, отправляемые с некоего анонимного адреса. АНБ поручили разыскать отправителя. Хотя агентство имело возможность потребовать от переадресующей компании открыть ему имя этого клиента, оно решило прибегнуть к более изощренному методу - следящему устройству.

 Не имеет понятия. Рассказ канадца показался ему полным абсурдом, и он подумал, что старик еще не отошел от шока или страдает слабоумием. Тогда он посадил его на заднее сиденье своего мотоцикла, чтобы отвезти в гостиницу, где тот остановился. Но этот канадец не знал, что ему надо держаться изо всех сил, поэтому они и трех метров не проехали, как он грохнулся об асфальт, разбил себе голову и сломал запястье.

 Сьюзан, - тихо сказал Стратмор, - с этим сначала будет трудно свыкнуться, но все же послушай меня хоть минутку.  - Он прикусил губу.  - Шифр, над которым работает ТРАНСТЕКСТ, уникален. Ни с чем подобным мы еще не сталкивались.

Никто этого не знает? - Ответа он не дождался. Техники и все прочие беспомощно смотрели на ВР. Джабба повернулся к монитору и вскинул руки.

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