empires of the atlantic world britain and spain in america pdf Saturday, May 22, 2021 6:57:53 PM

Empires Of The Atlantic World Britain And Spain In America Pdf

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Beginning in the fifteenth century, people, plants, pathogens, products, and cultural practices — just to mention some key agents — began to move regularly back and forth across the Atlantic Ocean.

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Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America 1492 - 1830

They also tend to be negative, but this one is not, on the whole. Paradoxically, however, this sweeping change in the way we view the past manifested itself initially in a proliferation of microhistories that fragmented our senses of early America as well as other places. Indeed in the early s Jack P. Greene and J. Some attempts to do so took a temporal approach to synthesis, positing a market revolution or even a transition to capitalism as ways of understanding early America as a whole Sellers, Kulikoff. The problem soon arose, however, that these epic and one-time only transformations seemed to be happening in the same place repeatedly, about every 30 years from the early seventeenth century through the eighteenth and way beyond our purview into the nineteenth.

Webb on Elliott, 'Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America 1492-1830'

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John H. New Haven: Yale University Press, Elliott's Empires of the Atlantic World compares the British and Spanish empires from the time of Columbus to the shattering of the old imperial order in the early nineteenth century. It offers a striking picture of how similar these empires were and yet how much they differed politically and culturally. To create a coherent story, Elliott divides the book into three parts: "Occupation," "Consolidation," and "Emancipation.

Enlarge Image. Elliott, one of the most distinguished and versatile historians working today, offers us history on a grand scale, contrasting the worlds built by Britain and by Spain on the ruins of the civilizations they encountered and destroyed in North and South America. Based on wide reading in the history of the two great Atlantic civilizations, the book sets the Spanish and British colonial empires in the context of their own times and offers us insights into aspects of this dual history that still influence the Americas. He challenges our prejudices about the Spanish conquest and the patriotic myths that have grown up around the English one. There is nothing black and white about this book. Elliott's writing.


This epic history compares the empires built by Spain and Britain in the Americas​, from Columbus's arrival in the New World to the end of Spanish colonial rule.


Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America 1492-1830

The Atlantic World comprises the interactions among the peoples and empires bordering the Atlantic Ocean rim from the beginning of the Age of Discovery to the early 21st century. Atlantic history is split between three different contexts: trans-Atlantic history, meaning the international history of the Atlantic World; circum-Atlantic history, meaning the transnational history of the Atlantic World; and cis-Atlantic history within an Atlantic context. Slavery ended in in the United States and in the s in Brazil and Cuba

Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America 1492 - 1830

Introduction: The Making and Unmaking of an Atlantic World

Science in the Spanish and Portuguese empires, —, , Colonial Latin American Review 15 01 , , Science in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires, , Science in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires , ,

John H. New Haven: Yale University Press, Comparing two empires, focusing on the individual, local, regional, and transatlantic contexts of European expansion, he aims to counter the "black legend" of Spanish imperialism. Elliott does not deny that the Spanish process of conquest could be, and often was, brutal. He argues, however, that the viciousness and chaos of initial contact were followed by something other than centuries of inept imperial management.

Asymmetries of power in the Americas are reflected in asymmetrical historiographies. Few historians have the experience and staying power to overcome such prejudices and preconceptions. After a long and distinguished teaching career at Cambridge, London, Princeton and Oxford, in he began work on the daunting project that has now been brought to a resoundingly successful conclusion: a comprehensive comparative history of the Spanish and British empires in the Americas. The strength of the book is the masterly way in which Elliott interrelates and compares the numerous different dimensions of British and Spanish policies in all their economic, political, religious and constitutional complexities. Covering the period from the arrival of the first Spanish and English colonists in the 16th century to the end of the independence struggles — , Elliott moves in broadly chronological fashion through a series of comparisons: differing patterns of conquest and settlement, distinct approaches to the indigenous peoples and material resources of the New World, contrasting visions of God, crown, state and empire. The result is a gripping and lavishly produced portrait both of the Spanish and British colonial projects, and of the widely varying social, political and economic orders to which they gave rise.


Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America [John H. Elliott] on hazarsiiraksamlari.org *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Empires of the.


Webb on Elliott, 'Empires of the Atlantic World: Britain and Spain in America 1492-1830'

Eliga Gould and others are constructing an approach to early modern Atlantic world studies that focuses on the entanglements inherent among the various competing European empires as they colonized the Americas and the Caribbean. This approach does not embrace or sanction traditional comparative histories emphasizing political differences between empires. Nevertheless, its adherents recognize that traditional analyses have helped historians discover the need to go beyond national narratives and discover the effects of metropolitan policy on peripheral people thousands of miles away. For the new Atlantic historians, empire is complicated by cultural as well as political interplay.

Professor Sir John Elliott is surely the most distinguished Anglophone historian of early modern Spain and its empire; and his mastery of that topic has enabled him to make an equally distinguished contribution to our understanding of Europe as a whole between the 15th and 18th centuries. In this collection of some of his most recent articles, essays and lectures, Elliott continues to demonstrate the remarkable qualities which have underpinned that reputation. One further observation by Elliott in this essay is elaborated in that which follows. In this way, Elliott throws into relief the subject of loyalty in the past, a theme which historians have arguably neglected for its opposite, disloyalty, rebellion, treachery. In seeking to explain it he suggests that the British approach rested on a want of confidence in the superiority of their own religion and culture which Ireland somehow played a part in.

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3 Comments

Garibaldo S. 26.05.2021 at 15:13

From the beginning of the European overseas expansion into the Atlantic in the 15th century onward, Europeans had to figure how to govern the newly conquered lands and peoples across Africa and the Americas.

Maurice H. 27.05.2021 at 21:21

'We were sure', wrote María Díaz from Mexico City in to her daughter in Seville, 'that we were going to perish at sea, because Read Online · Download PDF.

Ignace B. 28.05.2021 at 05:58

Beginning in the fifteenth century, people, plants, pathogens, products, and cultural practices — just to mention some key agents — began to move regularly back and forth across the Atlantic Ocean.

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