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Charles Le Gai Eaton Islam And The Destiny Of Man Pdf

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Islam And The Destiny Of Man Gai Eaton

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. The author, a former member of the British Diplomatic Service, was brought up as an agnostic and embraced Islam at an early age after writing a book commissioned by T.

Eliot on Eastern religions and their influence upon Western thinkers. As a Muslim he has retained his adherence to the perennial philosophy which, he maintains, underlies the teachings of all the great religions.

The aim of this book is to explore what it means to be a Muslim, a member of a community which embraces a quarter of the world's population and to describe the forces which have shaped the hearts and the minds of Islamic people.

After considering the historic confrontation between Islam and Christendom and analysing the difference between the three monotheistic faiths Judaism, Christianity, and Islam , the author describes the two poles of Muslim belief in terms of 'Truth' and 'Mercy'--the unitarian truth which is the basis of the Muslim's faith and the mercy inherent in this truth.

In the second part of the book he explains the significance of the Qur'an and tells the dramatic story of Muhammad's life and of the early Caliphate.

Lastly, the author considers the Muslim view of man's destiny, the social structure of Islam, the role of art and mysticism and the inner meaning of Islamic teaching concerning the hereafter. Throughout this book the author is concerned not with the religion of Islam in isolation, but with the very nature of religious faith, its spiritual and intellectual foundations, and the light it casts upon the mysteries and paradoxes of the human condition.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions 9. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Islam and the Destiny of Man , please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Islam and the Destiny of Man. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Islam and the Destiny of Man. Islam is a fundamentally different w this may be the best book I've ever read. Islam is a fundamentally different way to view reality LOVE this book. Oct 17, Murtaza rated it it was amazing Shelves: best-of There are two books I would recommend to any non-Muslim with an interest in learning about Islam.

I read this book many years ago in my youth, but was not really ready to absorb its lessons at the time. I'm glad I revisited it, because this is a beautiful and succinct encapsulation of the Islamic worldview. While many of it There are two books I would recommend to any non-Muslim with an interest in learning about Islam. While many of its themes were familiar to me, Eaton's elegant restatement of Islam as a totality is very worth reading for anyone seeking to learn for the first time, or those simply looking to do zikr remembrance through study.

While there is too much of value in this book to restate in a short review, a few key points bear mentioning. As Eaton explains, Islam's relationship to preexisting cultures is one of incorporating and continuing with all that comports with its view of reality, while shearing away that which conflicts.

Islam is also in his view a continuation and restatement of the perennial truths contained in previously revealed traditions, rather than being sui generis.

Islam's view of nature is that it points towards the divine, though modern man is no longer capable of understanding symbols and thus fails to see this.

The beautiful analogy he uses is that of a clock face, which contains vital information, while dissecting and tearing apart the clock itself as scientism does to nature would never be able to tell one the time.

Eaton also explains the Islamic attitude towards life, both in joy and suffering, which reflects the Muslim attitude that all that is good in the world is a temporal gift from God and that Earth was never intended to be a paradise.

Suffering for a Muslim was always understood as constituting a part of God's plan. This makes it bearable for one who is a believer in the unseen, whereas for the profane it remains an unbearable torment since it is essentially meaningless and thus "should" have been otherwise. Eaton also makes a good point that ordinary Muslims understand the concepts of Paradise and Hell on different levels, but it doesn't matter whether they take it literally or not as long as their understanding reflects the underlying true realities.

The only real problem is when they cease to believe in anything and spin into a total void of confusion and nihilism, as many have today due to lack of knowledge.

Eaton goes over Islamic history from the period of the Rashidun Caliphs through to the Abbasids. As he describes it, the primordial history of Islam was always intended as a symbolic message to mankind rather than as merely "events. Nonetheless the apparent chaos of early Islamic history at the elite level was actually quite removed from the lives of ordinary people of the era, reflecting the distance which pre-modern states had from the actual societies that they governed.

Those who sought power at the highest levels took a gamble with their lives, whereas ordinary people whose names we will never know relied on grassroots social structures to govern their lives.

Their experiences are not recorded in any epic histories yet they are the ones who built the social and ethical scaffolding that comprise the world of Islam, not the many caliphs, kings and princes who came and went with their dramas. It is fascinating to reflect that for over a thousand years a network of societies were governed under a set of metaphysical tenets which people saw as totally natural, appropriate and useful and that no one felt the need to change until they were partly obliterated by the onslaught of Western modernity.

Islam still persists today but it seems to do so in an increasingly confused manner for many people, Muslims included, because they have lost sight of its true depth. Perhaps Eaton's most powerful point in the book is that throughout its history the religion of Islam has been repeatedly revived by the arrival of outsiders into its fold.

It started with the Arabs, then came the Persians, Indians, Turks, Africans and so forth, with each new wave of converts bringing with them a renewal of understanding and purpose. In recent decades we have had Western converts like Eaton and many others to thank for once again powerfully reminding us of the ultimate truths expressed by the religion, reviving its vital force and powerfully explaining its continued necessity to modern people.

This book is an important read for anyone seeking to genuinely understand and it is a potent antidote to the rampant misconceptions which exist about Islam today, both among Muslims and non-Muslims. View 2 comments. Oct 24, Tim rated it it was amazing Shelves: islam , islam-perennialism.

Eaton describes himself in a way that was immediately identifiable, as a Muslim who came to the faith "through intellectual conviction and with a belief in the transcendent unity of all revealed religions". This transcendent unity in Islam, which is known through the principle of Tawhid, is a natural extension of the Oneness of Allah.

To state this principle as an article of faith and worldview is one thing, to realize its full implications is quite another - particularly for the Western mind. Islam identifies through religion, as nothing is outside of religion.

Practice and belief are all part of one coherent structure. Everything we see, everything we think, everything we do is a reflection of our Creator, and therefore nothing is outside of the Creator's domain. As humans, our independence is there in that we are created with free will, but not there in that we are dependent upon the Creator for that free will. Nonetheless, we are still human, and therefore subject to imperfections as humans. These imperfections are seen in how we follow the divine "law" which is at base simply a recognition of the nature of "being".

The law is as fundamental to Islam as is belief in the ONE. The law is not a separate sphere, it is life itself. It is how the perfected life operates.

It is congruent to the term "the laws of nature". There is no separation. This can be difficult for the Western mind to grasp, as Western culture is fundamentally built on Christendom, as much as we may or may not want to admit that. Christianity has over the centuries created separate compartments for the spiritual and the mundane. This world here and now is separated - in a sense - from the spiritual in a way that doesn't make sense to the Muslim.

Tawhid does not allow separation, everything is intertwined. It might be said that Western culture is only recently starting to realize this by acknowledging that "we are all one" or "we are all connected at base".

Islam has long realized this, even if certain Muslims don't always live out this belief in relation to other human beings.

Eaton is not only a Western Muslim, but has a vision of where that places him in the world. He has an incredible grasp of both generalized the West and Islam, and knows how to communicate through both to both in a way that is crucial for understanding. Oct 09, Lumumba Shakur rated it it was amazing Shelves: contemporary-islam , post-modernism , perennialism. This perhaps one of the most well written, insightful and captivating books that I have had the good pleasure to have read.

In sum, it is an advanced introduction to Islam with a Perennialist Philosophical outlook he probably references Schuon and Nasr more than anyone else.

It is at times a novel, a metaphysical treatise and cultural critique. I was initially disturbed by the philosophical underpinnings of the author, particularly the "universal validity of religions" of which the first quart This perhaps one of the most well written, insightful and captivating books that I have had the good pleasure to have read.

I was initially disturbed by the philosophical underpinnings of the author, particularly the "universal validity of religions" of which the first quarter of the book is laden, but he won me back over with an affectionate narrative of Umar ibn al-Khattab's rule and from that point on, the few perceived flaws of the book faded away into the background. This book is not without its flaws, however.

In addition to the perennial philosophy, he makes mention of the "closure of the gates of ijtihad" which is more of an annoyance than a serious flaw - though he manages gives a decent philosophical defense of it , his characterization of "intoxicated" Sufism is problematic AND he argues for the temporality of Hell something which in less confusing times was considered a blatant act of kufr.

But all o this more or less is what Perennialism is typically known for, so there is nothing new here.

Islam And The Destiny Of Man Gai Eaton

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Islam and the Destiny of Man. By Charles Le Gai Eaton. No Bibliography or Index. Eaton s Islam and the Destiny of Man is an attempt to provide us with an account. He was This is why we provide the books compilations in this website.

Born in Lausanne , Switzerland , and raised in London under the name Gai, Eaton was the son of the married Francis Errington and his mistress , Ruth; to hide her son's illegitimacy , Ruth claimed that she had been married to a Canadian , Charles Eaton an invention of Errington's, by then supposedly deceased , and that Charles had fathered the child. Having been passed over for military service during the Second World War , [1] in the late s and early s he worked as a lecturer, teacher and newspaper editor in Egypt at Cairo University [1] and Jamaica , before joining the British Diplomatic Service in Eaton was frequently critical of mainstream British Muslim opinion, and believed that Muslims themselves should have overthrown Saddam Hussein in the s. Regarding the invasion of Iraq , in an interview with Emel magazine , he stated, "I am very torn either way and I cannot quite make up my mind what I think But we are so hopeless and helpless we leave it to other people who have their own motives and their own objectives. The constant arrival of uneducated, non English-speaking immigrants from the subcontinent makes that more difficult.


Islam and the Destiny of Man, by Charles Le Gai Eaton. pages. State University of New York Press and The Islamic Texts Society, Albany


Islam And The Destiny Of Man | Gai Eaton

As a registered charity, the Islamic Texts Society is dependent on the financial support of its readers and of all those who share its educational vision to achieve its aims and objectives. If you are interested in supporting the activities of the Islamic Texts Society, please visit the Support Us page. Please consider buying books at full price as a way of supporting the charitable activities of the ITS. However, in Islam and the Destiny of Man , Gai Eaton is concerned not simply with Islam in isolation, but with the very nature of religious faith, its spiritual and intellectual foundations and the light it casts upon the mysteries and paradoxes of the human condition.

Charles Hasan Le Gai Eaton

 - Если оба элемента - уран, то как мы найдем различие между. - А вдруг Танкадо ошибся? - вмешался Фонтейн.  - Быть может, он не знал, что бомбы были одинаковые. - Нет! - отрезала Сьюзан.  - Он стал калекой из-за этих бомб.

Наконец она поняла, что каждая цифра обозначала букву с соответствующим порядковым номером. Она старательно расшифровывала текст, завороженная тем, как на первый взгляд произвольный набор цифр превращался в красивые стихи. В тот момент она поняла, что нашла свою любовь - шифры и криптография отныне станут делом ее жизни. Почти через двадцать лет, получив степень магистра математики в Университете Джонса Хопкинса и окончив аспирантуру по теории чисел со стипендией Массачусетского технологического института, она представила докторскую диссертацию- Криптографические методы, протоколы и алгоритмы ручного шифрования. По-видимому, ее работу прочел не только научный руководитель, потому что вскоре последовал телефонный звонок, а затем по почте ей доставили авиационный билет от АНБ.

Islam and the Destiny of Man by Charles Le Gai Eaton (Paperback, 1994)

 - Что случилось.

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Islam and the Destiny of Man. By Charles Le Gai Eaton. Albany, New York: State. University of New York Press, Pp. No Bibliography or Index.

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